Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Nerf Toy Guns Prices List.

This is listing of Nerf Guns price on Amazon


Nerf-N-Strike Bundle - Nintendo Wii Nerf-N-Strike Bundle - Nintendo Wii price: $49.95
Air Hunterz Mega Target by Zing Air Hunterz Mega Target by Zing price: $15.99
Nerf N-Strike Modulus ECS-10 Blaster Nerf N-Strike Modulus ECS-10 Blaster price: $44.96
Nerf Modulus Stealth Ops Upgrade Kit Nerf Modulus Stealth Ops Upgrade Kit price: $14.99
YK Super Machine Gun Spring Powered Toy Foam Dart & Water Polymer Ball Shooting Gun w/ Integrated Bipod, 10 Suction Darts, Clear Water Polymer Balls YK Super Machine Gun Spring Powered Toy Foam Dart & Water Polymer Ball Shooting Gun w/ Integrated Bipod, 10 Suction Darts, Clear Water Polymer Balls price: $35.95
Nerf Zombie Strike Doominator Blaster Nerf Zombie Strike Doominator Blaster price: $39.99
Nerf Modulus Strike and Defend Upgrade Kit Nerf Modulus Strike and Defend Upgrade Kit price: $15.99
Nerf N-Strike Mega Series RotoFury Blaster Nerf N-Strike Mega Series RotoFury Blaster price: $29.88
Nerf Modulus Flip Clip Upgrade Kit Nerf Modulus Flip Clip Upgrade Kit price: $14.99
Nerf Modulus 10-Dart Banana Clip Nerf Modulus 10-Dart Banana Clip price: $7.99
16' Baellar Cs Foam Dart Simulation Shooting Gun with Blue the Night Vision Laser Collimator and 2 Style Bullets 16" Baellar Cs Foam Dart Simulation Shooting Gun with Blue the Night Vision Laser Collimator and 2 Style Bullets price: $15.98
Nerf Rebelle Secrets and Spies Secret Shot Blaster Pink Nerf Rebelle Secrets and Spies Secret Shot Blaster Pink price: $19.99
NERF N-Strike Elite: Strongarm, Firestrike Blasters, Bandolier and 25 ammo refills ALL-MISSION PACK NERF N-Strike Elite: Strongarm, Firestrike Blasters, Bandolier and 25 ammo refills ALL-MISSION PACK price: $45.00

Hope you can find the best nerf guns price!!!

How to Shoot a Nerf Gun Accurately

Nerf guns can be a ton of fun to play with. But they can be hard to shoot accurately. Here are some things you can do if you are having trouble hitting your targets. But you must be careful.

Steps 1: Figure out how the gun shoots and reloads.


Figure out how the gun shoots and reloads.

By doing this you will learn to get the grips of the gun. You aren't going to be able to shoot anything if you can't fire and reload your gun. You almost always fire with the trigger and you almost always reload by inserting the darts into the front of the gun or inserting a magazine. You can also ( in guns like the Recon, Longstrike, and clip system guns is to put the dart in the cocking mechanism.)

Steps 2: Find a target


Find a target


You can also make nerf targets. Good targets are a soda can, a dartboard, or anything that you can shoot at with your dart gun.

Steps 3: Practice shooting and reloading every time you can.


Practice shooting and reloading every time you can.

Use a target and fire as many shots at it as you can as fast as possible. This will be useful when you play with your friends because you need to get another shot off quickly, or your friend will run up and get an easy hit on you.

Steps 4: Try different scenarios.


Try different scenarios.

Try hiding behind something and going up for a second to fire a shot, and then ducking again. You can also try putting your back to the back of a wall next to a doorway and practice peeking around and firing quick shots. Do anything that applies to what you want to use your Nerf gun for. 

Steps 5: Aim above the target slightly, nerf darts drop over distance.


Aim above the target slightly, nerf darts drop over distance.

Steps 6: Watch out for civilians.


Watch out for civilians.

Learn to aim through, over, or under a crowd of people as to not hit civilians and always hit your target.

Steps 7: Learn to use the wind to your advantage.


Learn to use the wind to your advantage.

Try not to shoot facing the wind and always try to circle around your target until the wind is hitting your back, then shoot. The extra push from the wind will help the dart fly harder, farther, and straighter.

Steps 8: Get a group of friends for a nerf war or a nerf battle and have fun!


Get a group of friends for a nerf war or a nerf battle and have fun!


From wikihow ( http://www.wikihow.com/Shoot-a-Nerf-Gun-Accurately )

Nerf N-Strike Mega Series RotoFury Blaster

Nerf N-Strike Mega Series RotoFury Blaster

Overview

Introduction

Experience the excitement, energy, and attitude of the Nerf brand, and find out why It's Nerf or Nothin'. Nerf N-Strike Elite blasters from Hasbro deliver the ultimate in blaster performance for Nerf battles. Take aim with the Nerf N-Strike Mega RotoFury blaster and send Mega Whistler darts screaming through the air!
Nerf N-Strike Elite blasters
Fire Mega Darts up to 90 Feet (27 Meters)
Fire Mega Darts up to 90 Feet (27 Meters)

Unleash a furious barrage of Mega Whistler darts onto the battlefield with the Nerf Mega RotoFury blaster! This Nerf N-Strike blaster fires 10 Whistler darts up to 90 feet (27 meters). The competition will know that the attack is underway when they hear the red foam Mega Whistler darts screaming through the air. Launch into action and show opponents the fury of dart-blasting domination with the Nerf N-Strike Mega RotoFury blaster that fires darts up to 90 feet (27 meters)!
Nerf and all related properties are trademarks of Hasbro.

10-Dart Rotating Drum

The N-Strike Mega RotoFury blaster from Nerf has a rotating drum that holds 10 Mega Whistler darts. Unleash rapid-fire fury and fire all 10 darts in a row without reloading. Pump the handle on this N-Strike Mega blaster, then pull the trigger to fire 1 dart at a time. If it's time to blast a barrage of darts, hold down the trigger and keep pumping the handle for slam-fire action that rapidly releases all 10 darts in a row!

10-Dart Rotating Drum
Unleash Rapid-fire Fury
Unleash Rapid-fire Fury

Take the Nerf N-Strike Mega RotoFury blaster onto the battlefield to unleash rapid-fire fury. Launch 10 darts in a row from rotating drum without reloading, and blast them fast with awesome slam-fire action. The Mega Whistler darts scream through the air up to 90 feet (27 meters)!

Includes

Includes blaster, 10 Mega Whistler darts, and instructions.

nerf rotofury


Tuesday, August 4, 2015

What is Shooter game ?

Shooter games are a subgenre of action game, which often test the player's speed and reaction time. It includes many subgenres that have the commonality of focusing on the actions of the avatar using some sort of weapon. Usually this weapon is a gun, or some other long-range weapon. A common resource found in many shooter games is ammunition. Most commonly, the purpose of a shooter game is to shoot opponents and proceed through missions without the player character dying.

Characteristics of shooters

There are many criteria to determine the type of shooter; listed below are some of the major divisions. Using the following, it is possible to categorize almost all shooters developed.

Perspective
The player usually views the events from behind the eyes of the character (a first-person shooter) or from a camera that follows the character, usually a few feet behind (a third-person shooter). It is also possible for a game to have a fixed camera, especially shooting gallery games and some 2D overhead shooters such as Robotron 2084.

Realism
Games that attempt to emulate lifelike ballistics and character damage include tactical shooters. But many shooter games involve varying levels of realism, with some verging on complete fantasy.

Number of characters
While most shooters are played as solo ventures, several offer the players the opportunity to control a squad of characters, usually directly controlling one, and giving orders to computer-controlled allies. Games which feature non-player characters fighting alongside the player, but which are not directly controllable (either by switching player control, or issuing orders to the character) are not considered squad-based games.

Multiplayer
If a shooter game is playable online, there are several other sharp divisions it can take. Many games will offer differing modes which allow players to choose from among various types, such as the following. In team modes, players are assigned to one of two (sometimes more, but very infrequently) factions which are competing for some goal. Co-op modes have several players on the same faction playing through either single-player or custom missions against computer-controlled enemies. Individual (often called team deathmatch) has all players competing with each other.

Focus
This is often an optional way to categorize a shooter, but in some cases it's needed to help distinguish it. A game may quite often heavily rely on stealth as opposed to direct action. Others might have large horror elements to them. However, the one thing in common with all shooters is that combat with a gun or similar long range/projectile weapon is the primary focus of gameplay itself.

Subgenres


Shoot 'em up
Shoot 'em ups are a specific subgenre of shooters wherein the player may move up and down and left and right around the screen, typically firing straight forward.

Shoot 'em ups share common gameplay, but are often categorized by viewpoint. This includes fixed shooters on fixed screens, such as Space Invaders and Galaxian; scrolling shooters that mainly scroll in a single direction, such as Xevious and Darius; top-down shooters (sometimes referred to as twin-stick shooters) where the levels are controlled from an overhead viewpoint, such as Bosconian and Time Pilot; rail shooters where player movement is automatically guided down a fixed forward-scrolling "rail", such as Buck Rogers: Planet of Zoom and Space Harrier; and isometric shooters which use an isometric perspective, such as Zaxxon and Viewpoint. This genre also includes "run and gun" games which emphasize greater maneuvering or even jumping, such as Thexder, Contra and Metal Slug.

Shooting gallery
Shooting gallery games include light gun games, although many can also be played using a regular joypad and an on-screen cursor to signify where the bullets are being aimed. When these debuted, they were typically played from a first-person perspective, with enemy fire that occurred anywhere on the screen damaging or killing the player. As they evolved away from the use of light guns, the player came to be represented by an on-screen avatar, usually someone on the bottom of the screen, who could move and avoid enemy attacks while returning fire. These sorts of shooters almost always utilize horizontal scrolling to the right to indicate level progression, with enemies appearing in waves from predestined locations in the background or from the sides. One of the earliest examples is the 1985 arcade game Shootout produced by Data East.

A specific subgenre of this type of game is the Cabal shooter, named for the game Cabal, in which the player controls an on-screen avatar that can run and often jump around the screen in addition to being able to aim their gun. Other games in this subgenre include Blood Bros., Dynamite Duke, NAM-1975, Wild Guns, and Sin and Punishment.

As light gun games became more prevalent and started to make use of fully 3D backgrounds, such as the Time Crisis or House of the Dead series, these sorts of games fell out of popular production, but many like Blood Bros. still have their fanbase today. Other notable games of this category include Operation Wolf and Laser Invasion.

Light gun shooter
Light gun shooters are shooting gallery games that use a pointing device for computers and a control device for arcade and video games. The first light guns appeared in the 1930s, following the development of light-sensing vacuum tubes. It was not long before the technology began appearing in arcade shooting games, beginning with the Seeburg Ray-O-Lite in 1936. These early light gun games used small targets (usually moving) onto which a light-sensing tube was mounted; the player used a gun (usually a rifle) that emitted a beam of light when the trigger was pulled. If the beam struck the target, a "hit" was scored. Modern screen-based light guns work on the opposite principle—the sensor is built into the gun itself, and the on-screen target(s) emit light rather than the gun. The first light gun of this type was used on the MIT Whirlwind computer, which used a similar light pen. Like rail shooters, movement is typically limited in light-gun games.

Notable games of this category include the 1974 and 1984 versions of Wild Gunman, Duck Hunt for the NES, the Virtua Cop series, Time Crisis series, House of the Dead series, and Resident Evil: The Umbrella Chronicles & Darkside Chronicles.

First-person shooters
Doom, one of the early games that defined the first-person shooter genre.

First-person shooters are characterized by an on-screen view that simulates the in-game character's point of view. While many rail shooters and light-gun shooters also use a first-person perspective, they are generally not included in this category.

Notable examples of the genre include Doom, Quake, Half-Life, Counter-Strike, GoldenEye 007, Battlefield, Medal of Honor, Unreal, Call of Duty, Killzone, TimeSplitters, Team Fortress 2, and Halo.

Third-person shooters
Third-person shooters are characterized by a third-person camera view that fully displays the player character in his/her surroundings. Notable examples of the genre include the Tomb Raider series, Syphon Filter, Max Payne, SOCOM, Star Wars: Battlefront, Resident Evil 4 and Gears of War.

Tactical shooters
Tactical shooters are shooters that generally simulate realistic squad-based or man-to-man skirmishes. Notable examples of the genre include Ubisoft's Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six and Ghost Recon series and Bohemia Software's Operation Flashpoint.

Other
Additionally, artillery games have been described as a type of "shooting game", though they are more frequently classified as a type of strategy game.

From Wiki (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shooter_game)